Featured

Shazam! (2019)

⭐⭐⭐☆☆

This is a spoiler free review

Shazam! (dir. by David F. Sandberg and written by Henry Gayden) tells the story of young Billy Batson (Asher Angel) who, after getting adopted into a large foster home, is transported to an alternate realm where he’s given great power and strength whenever he utters the word Shazam! Billy Batson, with the help of his new foster brother Freddy Freeman (Jack Dylan Grazer), adapts to and discovers the extent of his new powers. When a new threat (Mark Strong) rises with the intent to taken down Shazam, Billy must learn to embrace his new powers, and his new family, in order to earn the title of “superhero.”

I can imagine that with a certain other superhero movie that has been released to theaters more recently, many people might not be too interested in hearing my thoughts on a much smaller scale superhero film that came out over a month ago. Because I love superhero movies, though, and I want to still get my thoughts out about this film, I plan on reviewing this film and Avengers: Endgame this week. This way I will also not be too behind on my reviews.

As I mentioned before, this movie is much smaller in scale than most other superhero films, but I actually think that’s quite refreshing. The focus is mostly on Billy, him getting used to his new powers, and the foster family. Quite honestly, all three of those things encompass some of the best moments of the film, as well as Zachary Levi as the adult version of Billy that he turns into. I really bought him as Billy and thought that he captured both the comedic potential of a “child being trapped in a man’s body,” the characterization of Billy himself, and what a boy his age would say and do in his situation.

(from left) Shazam! (Zachary Levi) and Frederick “Freddy ” Freeman (Jack Dylan Grazer) look on at some incoming trouble in a convenience store.

With that being said, I thought a lot of the writing and direction was really spot on, especially when it came to the stuff involving Billy and him coming to terms with his new powers. Not only do I think that Asher Angel did a great job creating a sympathetic and believable character, but I also kept think to myself, “yeah, that’s exactly what a kid would do if they were given the ability to turn into a super-powered adult.” Some of the best parts of the movie are Billy and Freddy learning what his new powers are and putting them to the test, in addition to Billy trying to get away with adult things in his new “adult” form. Both aspects to the film were very hilarious and fun to watch.

Billy’s backstory, as well as the foster family, kept the entire film feeling grounded and real- which is something that I think is rarely done with the newer DC films. I really sympathized with Billy Batson and his backstory. Like I mentioned before, the themes related to family really helped ground this film and give a real humanity to everything happening. I really liked the members of the foster family. Some of them, particularly the foster kids played by Grace Fulton and Jovan Armand, were presented with character arcs that didn’t really go anywhere, and as a result get sidelined. However, I thought that Jack Dylan Grazer as Freddy was great in his performance, his chemistry with Billy, and with his characterization. I also loved the two foster parents. Although they didn’t get a ton of screen time, I really sympathized with them and what they were doing for both Billy and the others. I just really loved the entire dynamic between Billy and the foster home. There was a certain wholesomeness to it all that I really haven’t seen in most superhero movies.

While I do think that the film’s antagonist, Dr. Thaddeus Sivana, was a little weak, Mark Strong did a good job with his performance, and the villain (+the creatures that are sort of controlling the villain) was a legitimate threat and legitimately intimidating. There’s this great scene about halfway through the movie where these monsters (which do have legitimate unique designs if not a bit bland color schemes) are in a boardroom with a bunch of people. I won’t give much more away, but I certainly did not see that scene getting as intense as it did. Besides that, the villain wasn’t particularly complex, and I never really got a sense of what his grand scheme was. On the other hand, I do think that Dr. Sivana’s main motivation does make sense. It’s based on something that happened to him when he was a child, which I think does connect him more to Billy, who is also a child and is going through a similar struggle that Sivana went through but never learned to let go.

Shazam! is engaged in his first fight against a supervillian, Dr. Thaddeus Sivana (Mark Strong).

The visual effects I thought were overall, pretty well done. There were a couple of creatures in the film which I thought every now and then looked a little fake, but only briefly, and the cool designs were enough to overcompensate for some of the weaker effects. With that being said, there are a few complaints I have about this movie. For one thing, I didn’t think that there was a lot of action in the movie, and even the action that was in the movie wasn’t very memorable. I thought that the third act also went on a little too long.

All in all, I really enjoyed Shazam! Even with the few critiques I listed above weren’t complete deal breakers, especially considering that the best scenes are Billy simply getting used to his new powers, and him interacting with Freddy and the rest of the foster family. It’s a really sweet, funny, and all around fun film that never forgets what the heart of the film is. While it’s not Into The Spider-verse levels of heartfelt and memorable, and while I’m not dying to revisit it like I was when I first saw Infinity War, it’s still an enjoyable film that deserves a watch.

Featured

Captain Marvel (2019)

⭐⭐ 1/2 out of 5 stars

This is a SPOILER FREE review

For a brief synopsis, Captain Marvel (directed by Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck and written by Anna Boden, Ryan Fleck, and Geneva Robertson-Dworet) follows the story of Vers (Brie Larson), a Kree warrior who has no memory of her past. While on a mission to intercept the Skrulls a race of alien shape-shifters that the Kree are at war with, Vers is both separated from her team and unlocks some memories that may hold the key to her past. After crash landing on Earth, she teams up with low level S.H.I.E.L.D agent Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) and Air Force pilot Maria Rambeau (Lashana Lynch) to discover who she is and put a stop to the war once and for all.

Before I give my thoughts on this movie, I should say that I really didn’t have high expectations going in (and no not for the reason that you may think). Honestly, the trailers just looked really boring. Captain Marvel herself just looked like a very uninteresting character and the story seemed very cliche. A “powerful being” with a “mysterious past” learns that “something in her past” may prove that she’s “more powerful than she ever realized.” Going in, I of course did not want this movie to fail, the promotional material just wasn’t giving me much hope that this would be an interesting story.

I am a little saddened to report that the movie was better than the trailers, but it was still just… okay. While it wasn’t necessarily bad, it was not that memorable either.

I will say that this story is told a little differently than other Marvel films. That’s more of a neutral statement than anything else. Instead of starting out as a normal person, Carol Danvers starts out as a powerful Kree warrior in space. Once she lands on earth, she must both hunt down the enemy and discover who she really is. This, I think, leads into one of the main problems with the story. The characters are constantly going from point A to B, from one set piece to another, that we never really a chance to get to know any of the characters. We never really get a moment, say, as fun or as character building as the Thor’s Hammer Lifting scene in Avengers: Age of Ultron. It wasn’t really helped by the fact that the trailers pretty much showed who she was before getting her powers, so there weren’t that many surprises with that plot point.

From left: Maria Rambeau (Lashana Lynch) and Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) prepare for an air force mission.

Another problem, unfortunately, lies with Captain Marvel herself. Watching the trailers, she really didn’t seem that interesting or that she had a lot of energy. And while I do think they brought a little more energy and charisma than I was expected, she was overall just a very boring and confused character. Part of that I think lies in the performance. Okay, as a performer myself, I HATE to critique acting, especially since I don’t know what the direction was like or what the actor was going for. And I have no doubt that Brie Larson is a very good actress; however, I just don’t think she was right for this role. That really sucks for me to say because Marvel usually does phenomenal with casting. I also don’t think that it’s entirely her fault. I feel as though the directors, writers, and Larson had no idea how to make this character interesting. She alternates constantly between being stoic and stone faced to more sarcastic and laid back. They don’t even really play up the whole fish out of water scenario with her being on Earth either. It’s mostly just scene or two because they need to move on to the next plot point. Another huge problem is that characters keep commenting on what they want you to believe is a major character flaw, that she needs to keep her emotions under control, but that character flaw is never demonstrated nor does it really ever effect her negatively because it always seem like she has her emotions under control (to the point where she can sometimes have very little emotion). That’s not to say, she does give an occasional funny line or emote some charisma, but it’s overall a very muddled and rather boring character.

Now lets talk about the supporting cast, a stand out being Samuel L. Jackson. At first, I was rather confused about what he was doing, until I realized that this is a younger more naive and energetic Nick Fury, and he does a great job playing this younger version of himself who’s very energetic and charismatic. He even gets a couple of laughs (although there was this whole thing how he is obsessed with cats which I think was supposed to be funny but came off as kind of strange). I even think that Captain Marvel is at her best when she interacts with him. I should also say that the de-aging effects on him is phenomenal! It’s so seamless that you don’t even notice that it’s an effect. The other new characters are not much more interesting. However, I will say that I thought Lashana Lynch as Carol Danver’s best friend did very well and had a few very good, standout acting and character moments. Jude Law’s character Yon-Rogg I thought was very boring. I don’t think it’s an acting problem, the character is just written very flat, and what they decide to do with that character is very underwhelming.

Now let’s get into some positives. I will say that there is a bate and switch between characters in the film that leads to another subplot. While others may find this forgettable, I actually thought it worked really well and added some much needed emotional stakes to the story. I also thought the cat, Goose, was pretty cute and had a couple of stand out moments (also because I’m a cat lover so it’s very refreshing to have a cute, fun little cat character when it’s so often a dog). And there were maybe one or two really entertaining action scenes. One where’s shes escaping from the enemy ship while still in bondage, and the other is the train chase (it’s the part in the trailer where she punches the old lady). It was also a little refreshing to see a film take place in the 90s as opposed to the 80s, which has been the trend for some time now (even though I’m a sucker for the 80s aesthetic, music, and nostalgia). The effects were well done. The only really bad CGI is when she’s flying in space and the cat in a couple of scenes

From left: Talos (Ben Mendelsohn) and his fellow Skrulls wash up on shore looking for Captain Marvel.

Although I praised the escape and train scenes, most of the action was very underdeveloped. There were a couple action scenes where you couldn’t even make out what was going on because it was so dark. Even in the scenes where lighting wasn’t an issue, you couldn’t even make out some of the action because they used so much shaky cam. Even the climax (which lasted maybe five minutes) was underwhelming. I should also say that I didn’t really find the movie all that funny. Look, I don’t expect nor want every single Marvel movie to be like Thor: Ragnarok, where it’s just joke after joke. And if you’re just going to this movie not for the Marvel lore but just for a dumb, fun and funny action film, then you will very disappointed. They did have plenty of jokes and quips to be found in this film, but most of them, for me, just didn’t land. I chuckled a couple of times, but there was no real genuine laugh out loud moments.

The final thing I have to say is, and I won’t spoil it, but they change up the Marvel Logo at the beginning, which was amazing and super heartfelt. There was a cameo from a certain person that was amazing and made me smile. Also, stay for the mid-credit scene (as if you need to be told to do so), but you could honestly skip the after credit scene.

All in all it’s a very average, underwhelming, even boring film at times. That’s not to say there weren’t some genuinely fun moments or good lines, it’s just muddled into a pretty mundane final product. I know I’m not alone in feeling this way, but I also know there are people who really enjoyed it, so I would still say check it out and see for yourself.